GUIDELINE

Part G explained

Part D Materials and Workmanship

Part F Ventilation

Acceptable Construction Details

Acceptable Construction Details Introduction Thermal Bridging and Airtightness

Insulation in Cavity

• Diagram H ACD - 30 Ope split Lintels Ste... • Diagram H ACD - 12 Concrete Intermediate... • Diagram H ACD - 39 Concrete Forward cill... • Diagram H ACD - 38 Concrete backward cil... • Diagram H ACD - 19 Eaves Unventilated At... • Diagram H ACD - 40 Eaves Wall head close... • Diagram H ACD - 29 Flat roof parapet - I... • Diagram H ACD - 9 Insulation below groun... • Diagram H ACD - 33 Prestressed Concrete ... • Diagram H ACD - 22 Eaves Insulation betw... • Diagram H ACD - 15 Timber separating flo... • Diagram H ACD - 17 Masonry Partition Wal... • Diagram H ACD - 18 Stud partition wall -... • Diagram H ACD - 7 Insulation above groun... • Diagram H ACD - 21 Eaves Insulation betw... • Diagram H ACD - 14 Timber Intermediate f... • Diagram H ACD - 27 Gable Insulation betw... • Diagram H ACD - 26 Gable Insulation betw... • Diagram H ACD - 11 Timber suspended grou... • Diagram H ACD - 23 Eaves Insulation betw... • Diagram H ACD - 32 Ope Perforated Steel ... • Diagram H ACD - 20 Eaves Ventilated Atti... • Diagram H ACD - 34 Ope Jamb with closer ... • Diagram H ACD - 29 Flat roof Eaves - Ins... • Diagram H ACD - 8 Insulation above grou... • Diagram H ACD - 13 Concrete Intermediate... • Diagram H ACD - 28 Gable Insulation betw... • Diagram H ACD - 35 Ope Jamb with proprie... • Diagram H ACD - 36 Corner Inverted Corne... • Diagram H ACD - 16 Masonry solid and cav... • Diagram H ACD - 25 Eaves Insulation betw... • Diagram H ACD - 10 Insulation below grou... • Diagram H ACD - 37 Galvanised Top steel ...

Irish Water Requirements for Dwellings

Typical Inspection Reports

No 26 Inspection of Windows on Rainwater System No 2. Inspection Foundations Radon Sump Barrier and Blinding No 11. Inspection of Block work, Brickwork and feature stone band No 12. Inspection of Block work, gable and party walls. No 2. Inspection Foundations Radon Sump Barrier and Blinding No 3. Inspection Radon Barrier Blinding and Insulation No 22 Inspection Steel Beams and Intumescent paint No 28. Inspection of timber stairs installation No 4. Inspection of Radon Barrier and DPC No 5. Inspection Radon Barrier Rising Walls Block and Brickwork No 25 Inspection of Windows on Front Elevations, DPM and Control Joint No 8. Inspection of Blockwork and elements No 17. Inspection of Stud wall construction No 23 Inspection of windows and doors being installed No 14 Inspection of Structural Beams No 19. Inspection of Roof Construction and breathable membrane No 21 Inspection of Electrical first fix No 10. Inspection of Joisting , bridging, Block work, Brickwork and Lintel supports No 27 Inspection of Windows on Velux Rooflights No 7. Inspection of Rising walls, Damp proof Course and Blockwork. No 16. Inspection of Stud wall construction. No 18. Inspection of Roof Construction. No 7. Inspection of Chasing Block work, Brickwork and feature stone band No 6. Inspection Rising Walls Block and Brickwork No 8. Inspection of Radon Barrier and Damp proof Course. No 30 Inspection of timber stairs handrail installation No 15. Inspection of Stud wall and floor joist construction No 29. Inspection of timber stairs and handrail during construction stages No 3. Inspection Radon Barrier Blinding and Insulation No 31. Inspection of Timber stairs handrail. No 32. Inspection of Roof Access Hatch No 24 Inspection of Windows on Front and Rear Elevations No 20. Inspection of chasing in block party walls for electrical first fix No 13. Inspection Brickwork and Firestopping No 9. Inspection of Brick and Block work from 1st to 2nd floor

Part G explained

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General requirements

The Building Regulations requirements for Hygiene is set out under Part G1 of Technical Guidance Document G for Bathrooms and Kitchens

A dwelling shall be provided with:

  • a bathroom containing either a fixed bath or a shower bath, and a washbasin, and

  • a kitchen containing a sink of adequate size and a draining board, and

  • a suitable installation for the provision of hot and cold water to the bath or shower bath, washbasin and sink.

Bathroom requirement for dwellings

Every dwelling (house or flat) should have at least one bathroom, with a fixed bath or shower, and a washbasin.

Kitchen requirement for dwellings

Every dwelling (house or flat) should have a kitchen which is adequately fitted for the installation and use of cooking equipment. The kitchen should contain a sink of adequate size and a draining board.

Cold water supply requirements

The cold water supply to the kitchen sink should be taken directly from the service pipe supplying water to the dwelling;

  • The cold water supply to the bath or shower and the washbasin and to other appliances in the dwelling should be from a cold water storage cistern.

  • The bath, shower, washbasin, and sink should also have a piped supply of hot water, which may be from a central source or from a unit water heater.

Discharge from bathroom

The bath, shower, washbasin and sink should discharge through a trap and branch pipe to a discharge stack, or may, if it is on the ground floor, discharge into a gully.

Further Guidance on drainage is provided in Part H - Drainage located in Section H of this app.

Guidance on sinks

Guidance is provided in the following standards:

  • IS 132 Part 1:1975

  • IS 132: 1964

  • IS I.S. EN13310 : 2003

Capacity of cold water cistern

The cold water storage cistern should have:

  • an actual capacity of not less than 212 litres in the case of a dwelling containing up to three bedrooms.

  • an actual capacity of not less than 340 litres in the case of a dwelling containing four or more bedrooms.

Cistern access and container

The cistern should be properly covered but not airtight, accessible for cleaning and replacement, and fitted with an overflow pipe so located as to discharge in a manner that will give ready warning of the occurrence of overflow without causing any nuisance or any dampness in the dwelling

Service pipe to a dwelling

The service pipe to each dwelling should be provided with a stopcock or sluice valve fitted with a crutch wheel for manual operation in a convenient position within the dwelling and near to the point of entry of the pipe to the dwelling.

Protection from frost

The cistern, service pipe and fittings and any associated cold water pipes should be adequately protected against damage by frost, These should be insulated or adequately protected.

Other types of dwellings

For other types of dwellings, e.g. apartments in apartment blocks or multi-occupancy buildings, alternative arrangements or ways of achieving compliance may be appropriate, subject to the approval of Irish Water

What is a flushing device?

Flushing device - A device fitted to a cistern to provide controlled measured volume(s) of water to a WC pan or suite for flushing.

What is a pressure flush valve?

Pressure Flush Valve - A valve directly connected to a stored water supply, which delivers a pre-determined volume of flushing water for removal of excrement from a WC pan. Two third/ one third flush buttons are examples and are ways of conserving water.

How many bathrooms, toilets etc do you need to provide?

Guidance on the scale of provision, selection, installation, and special requirements of sanitary appliances in domestic, commercial and public buildings is contained in BS 6465 Sanitary installations, Part 1; Part 2 and Part 3 : 2006.

Every dwelling (house or flat) should have at least one water closet and one washbasin. The washbasin should be located in, or adjacent to, the room containing the water closet.

For Accessible requirements in Dwellings please refer to Appendix M or Section M3 of Technical Guidance Document M.

Separation of kitchens and cooking areas from bathrooms/sanitary facilities

A room or space containing a water closet should be separated from a place used for the preparation or cooking of food by means of a door in a dwelling.

Requirements of water closets/urinals

Any sanitary convenience (water closet or urinal) should be of such design as to facilitate efficient use of water for flushing. Any flushing device should be capable of cleansing the water closet pan effectively.

Volume of water required for flushing?

All water closets should have a maximum flush volume of 6 litres or less and comply with the requirements for class 2 products in IS EN 997:2003 regardless of the type of flushing device employed.

The type of flushing activator e.g. handle, button, sensor etc., will be dependent on particular design and aesthetics.

Manual flushing requirements

For all manually activated flushing devices (except pressure flushing valves) a dual flush facility combining a maximum flush volume of 6 litres and a reduced flush volume no greater than two thirds of the maximum should be used.

Activation of flush mechanism

The method of activation of the dual flush should be readily discernible e.g. separate buttons or pads of different sizes, segmented buttons (two-thirds, one third) etc.

Please see Appendix M and Technical Guidance Document M for further guidance on accessible WCs

Volumetric water requirements for flushing

Guidance on Drainage and Waste Water disposal given TGD H is based on a maximum flush volume of 5 litres or more.

Where WCs with maximum flush volumes of less than 5 litres are used, consideration should be given to the increased risk of blockages. Guidance on the design of sanitary pipework suitable for use with WCs with maximum flush volumes as low as 4 litres can be found in IS EN 12056.

What do we need to comply with if we are upgrading sanitary facilities

When an existing WC suite, comprising of WC pan and flushing cistern is to be replaced by a suite incorporating a manual flushing device (except a pressure flushing valve), a dual flush facility should be installed i.e. 2/3 1/3 .

Alternatively, a single flush WC suite of maximum flush volume 6 litres may be used when replacing existing WC suites of flush volumes greater than 6 litres, for example 7.5, 9 or 13 litres.

However, if the flushing cistern alone is to be changed, without changing the WC pan, the replacement should be of the same size as the one it replaces.

A single flush cistern should not be replaced with a dual flush cistern, when the WC pan is remaining.

Are there any requirements for the surfaces of sanitary appliances

Every sanitary appliance should have a surface which is smooth and non-absorbent and capable of being easily cleaned.

Requirements for water supplies to wash basins?

A washbasin should be provided with a hot water supply and a cold water supply.

Requirement states that a washbasin provided in, or adjacent to, a room containing a water closet (toilet) should have a supply of hot water, which may be from a central source or from a unit water heater, and a piped supply of cold water from a storage cistern.

Standards for cold water supply

A cold water storage system should be designed and installed in accordance with the recommendations set out in BS 6700: 2006.

Requirements for the discharge from water closets

A water closet should discharge through a trap and branch pipe into a discharge stack or a foul drain. No part of the water closet pan should be connected to any pipe other than a flush pipe or branch pipe.

Requirements for the discharge from washbasins

A washbasin should discharge through a trap and branch pipe to a discharge stack or may, where the washbasin is located on the ground floor, discharge into a gully.

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